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Rustin was a long-time associate of both Randolph and Dr. With Randolph concentrating on building the march's political coalition, Rustin built and led the team of two hundred activists and organizers who publicized the march and recruited the marchers, coordinated the buses and trains, provided the marshals, and set up and administered all of the logistic details of a mass march in the nation's capital.The march was not universally supported among civil rights activists.Amateur MILFs, Wife Blog, Cuckold Forum, MILF Discounts, Nude Dares, Blonde MILF, Milf Sex Cams, Single Moms, Hot Moms, MILF Personals, MILF Moms, Nude Amateurs, Date a MILF, Free MILFs, BDSM Personals, Cuckold Personals, Real amateur MILFs.Hot picture galleries in the links below - UPDATED!



In early 1963 they called publicly for "a massive March on Washington for jobs".Some, including Rustin (who assembled 4,000 volunteer marshals from New York), were concerned that it might turn violent, which could undermine pending legislation and damage the international image of the movement.March organizers themselves disagreed over the purpose of the march.Many people wanted to march on Washington, but disagreed over how the march should be conducted.

Some called for a complete shutdown of the city through civil disobedience.

Randolph and Rustin intended to focus the March on economic inequality, stating in their original plan that “integration in the fields of education, housing, transportation and public accommodations will be of limited extent and duration so long as fundamental economic inequality along racial lines persists.” This coalition of leaders, who became known as the "Big Six", included: Randolph who was chosen as the titular head of the march, James Farmer, president of the Congress of Racial Equality; John Lewis, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee; Martin Luther King Jr., president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference; About two months before the march, the Big Six broadened their organizing coalition by bringing on board four white men who supported their efforts: Walter Reuther, president of the United Automobile Workers; Eugene Carson Blake, former president of the National Council of Churches; Mathew Ahmann, executive director of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice; and Joachim Prinz, president of the American Jewish Congress.